11 Night Italy, France & Spain Cruise on Jewel of the Seas from Rome, Civitavecchia, Italy Cartagena, Spain Lighthouse
The 11 Night Italy, France & Spain Cruise from Rome, Civitavecchia, Italy visits Florence / Pisa (La Spezia), Italy; Portofino, Italy; Provence (Marseille), France; Sete, France; Cartagena, Spain; Gibraltar, United Kingdom; Málaga, Spain; Palma De Mallorca, Spain; Barcelona, Spain. Explore our cruise itineraries and choose from a variety of rooms depending on your needs and budget. Start planning your next cruise vacation by selecting a destination and departure port.
Royal Caribbean Cruises
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11 Night Italy, France & Spain Cruise
Itinerary Overview
Explore Jewel of the Seas
Day 1 - Rome (Civitavecchia), Italy
Day 2 - Florence / Pisa (La Spezia), Italy
Day 3 - Portofino, Italy
Day 4 - Provence (Marseille), France
Day 5 - Sete, France
Day 6 - Cruising
Day 7 - Cartagena, Spain
Day 8 - Gibraltar, United Kingdom
Day 9 - Málaga, Spain
Day 10 - Cruising
Day 11 - Palma De Mallorca, Spain
Day 12 - Barcelona, Spain
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Cartagena, Spain Lighthouse
Cartagena, Spain Lighthouse by the Coast
This is your

11 Night Italy, France & Spain Cruise

Explore This Itinerary
Leaving from
Rome (Civitavecchia), Italy
Onboard
Jewel of the Seas
Day Port
1
Rome (Civitavecchia), Italy
Departs at 5:00 PM
2
Florence / Pisa (La Spezia), Italy
From 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM
3
Portofino, Italy
Tendered from 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM
4
Provence (Marseille), France
From 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
5
Sete, France
From 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
6
Cruising
Day at sea
7
Cartagena, Spain
From 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
8
Gibraltar, United Kingdom
From 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
9
Málaga, Spain
From 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
10
Cruising
Day at sea
11
Palma De Mallorca, Spain
From 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
12
Barcelona, Spain
Arrives at 6:00 AM
*Port sequence may vary by sailing date.
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Your ship Jewel of the Seas

Your ship
Jewel of the Seas
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Jewel of the Seas, Exterior View, Caribbean and European Cruise Destinations
Exterior view of Jewel of the Seas Cruise With Destinations in Puerto Rico, Antigua, Barbados, and more
Get to know
Jewel of the Seas
After a day spent wandering new shores, dive into a world of thrills on Jewel of the Seas®. Scale the Rock Climbing Wall or catch a movie on the poolside screen. Grab your playbill for West End to Broadway and raise a glass at Vintages. It's time to go all-in on adventure.

DECKED OUT FOR ADVENTURE

Discover countless ways to spend your days between ports, like fueling friendly competition in a round of mini golf and taking adventure to new heights on the Rock Climbing Wall. If you're after laid back lounging, catch a movie on the poolside screen or check into Vitality℠ at Sea Spa and Fitness Center.

DIG INTO DARING

Whether you're sipping wines from around the world at Vintages, savoring fresh-rolled sushi at Izumi, indulging in prime steaks at Chops Grille℠ or sitting down to a five-course epicurean adventure at Chef's Table, you're bound to find flavors as thrilling as the shores you'll explore.

NOT THE SAME OLD SONG & DANCE

Travel from London's West End to New York City in West End to Broadway, a cross-continental celebration of music theater production. And journey from ancient Atlantis to colorful India in the celestial show City of Dreams. On this ship, every show's a hit.

Day 1: Rome, Italy

Day 1
Rome
Civitavecchia, Italy
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Rome (Civitavecchia), Italy Colosseum
View of the Colosseum in Rome, Italy
Things to do in
Rome
Departs at 5:00 PM
With 28 centuries of celebrated history, Rome holds the edge when it comes to unrivaled adventures. The city that sparked the world’s largest empire is very much alive today with a jumble of ancient ruins, world-renowned art and vivacious street culture. Here you can live la dolce vita, recalling the glory days of Ancient Rome and twirling forks full of pasta in a trattoria. Ride past centuries-old basilicas in a three-wheeled Ape Calessino, or stand in awe of paintings by Italian masters at Villa Borghese. Whether it’s Vatican City’s spiritual allure, Trastevere’s backstreet charms, or the Colosseum’s embattled legacy— The Eternal City endures with endless adventures.
Rome (Civitavecchia), Italy Pantheon
The Pantheon in Rome, Italy

ANCIENT AND AMAZING

Walk through the heart of Ancient Rome. Start at the Colosseum, an enormous arena where gladiators once battled. Then meander around the Roman Forum’s timeworn ruins, past crumbling temples and basilicas. See where emperors lived on Palatine Hill— and enjoy an up-close view of the 2,000-year-old, well-preserved Pantheon church.
Insider tip
The train ride between Civitavecchia and Rome is approximately 80 minutes each way.
Rome (Civitavecchia), Italy Piazza Navona
A fountain in Piazza Navona in Italy

ADVENTURE SQUARED

Roam around Rome’s piazzas, as each offers a unique perspective. Dine al fresco in Piazza Navona and climb The Spanish Steps in Piazza di Spagna. Wander cobbled alleys in bustling Trastevere and browse Campo de’ Fiori’s artisan stalls. Be sure to toss a coin in the Trevi Fountain for good measure.
Rome (Civitavecchia), Italy, Statues
Statues in the Vatican Museum

SACRED SPACES

Explore the Vatican Museums’ extraordinary collection of tapestries and classical statues. Step inside the Sistine Chapel and be awed by Michelangelo’s ceiling frescoes. Then enter St. Peter’s Basilica, one of the world’s largest churches, to stand under its enormous sky-piercing dome.
Rome (Civitavecchia), Italy, Pizza and pasta
Pizza, pasta, and antipasta on a table in Rome

LOCAL CUISINE

Romans live to eat, whether it’s family-style or in a sidewalk café. For an authentic taste of Cucina Romana, try carciofi alla Romana (braised artichokes) or spaghetti alla carbonara. Enjoy panino (stuffed sandwiches) or thin-crusted Roman pizza. Satisfy your sweet tooth with a scoop of gelato. Then finish the night with a glass of white wine from the surrounding Lazio region.
Rome (Civitavecchia), Italy, Colosseum Vatican Models
Minitature models of the Colosseum and Vatican

SHOPPING

Street stalls throughout the city are your best bet for souvenirs. Via Condotti offers a string of couture Italian designers. Browse artist studios along Via Margutta, or the indie artisan retailers of the Monti neighborhood. Porta Portese is the city’s largest flea market— and La Rinascente, the first department store.

Day 2: Florence / Pisa, Italy

Day 2
Florence / Pisa
La Spezia, Italy
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Florence - Pisa, Italy Aerial View
Aerial view of Florence, Italy
Things to do in
Florence / Pisa
From 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM
The northern Italian port city of La Spezia, on the border of Liguria and Tuscany, offers an ideal gateway to two of the country's most famous cities: Pisa and Florence. Just one hour by car or train will bring you to Pisa, where you can check out the white-stone arches of the city's famous leaning tower and its sister-structure, the Pisa Cathedral. Or spend your day in Florence, about two hours away by train: Climb to the top of the famous Duomo ("dome"), the nickname for the Italian Gothic Santa Maria del Fiore cathedral, for stunning 360-degree views of the city. Cruise to Florence to stroll through the San Lorenzo market with an espresso in hand and take in the smells of local spices and truffles as you people-watch.
Florence - Pisa, Italy Marble Statue
A marble statue with the Leaning Tower of Pisa in the background

Lean Into Adventure

Climb the 251 steps up the spectacular Leaning Tower or Campanile (bell tower) on the Field of Miracles in Pisa. The 56-meter-high tower took almost 200 years to build, but it was already leaning when it was unveiled in 1372. Access is limited to 45 people at a time. Book online in advance to save a space — many tourists flock here.
Insider tip
You can skip the lines at many of Florence's museums by buying tickets online before your visit.
Florence - Pisa, Italy Duomo Close Up
Close up of the Duomo Santa Maria Del Fiore toweing over Florence, Italy

Day at the Duomo

In Florence, you can't miss the Santa Maria del Fiore cathedral, more commonly called the Duomo in honor of its red-tiled cupola, or dome. The city's most iconic landmark, dating back to 1296, the Duomo's pink, white and green marble facade is a must-take photo. Head inside to admire the 44 stained-glass windows and Vasari's magnificent fresco of the Last Judgment.
Insider tip
Always carry euros. Some restaurants and shops operate on a cash-only basis.
Florence - Pisa, Italy Uffizi Gallery
The Uffizi Gallery in Florence, Italy

Museum of the Masters

The Galleria degli Uffizi is one of Italy's most famous and star-studded art museums. Cruise to Florence to admire the mind-blowing masterpieces of the Italian Renaissance, including works by Sandro Botticelli and Leonardo da Vinci, as well as German, Flemish, Dutch and French masters. Just remember it's closed on Mondays.
Florence - Pisa, Italy Fettuccine Pasta
Fettuccine pasta served in a white bowl

Local Cuisine

Tuscany has its own unique cuisine and pasta dishes. Try fresh pecorino (sheep's milk cheese), fazzoletti (pasta filled with ricotta and spinach), papardelle (broad noodles), ribollita (a variation on minestrone) or zuppe di cavolo (cabbage soup). What about some pan ficato (fig cake) or castagnaccio (chestnut-flour cake with nuts) for dessert?
Florence - Pisa, Italy Leather bags
Leather bags for sale in Florence, Italy

Shopping

Shop for souvenirs and jewelry at the Ponte Vecchio bridge in Florence. Mercato Centrale is the locals' favorite for food shopping. Buy or taste wine and truffles in Enoteca Obsequium during your Florence cruise. The best olive oils, platters and soaps can be bought from La Bottega dell'Olio. In Pisa, go Italian fashion shopping in Borgo Stretto for luxury items and Corso Italia for more affordable leather bags and shoes.

Day 3: Portofino, Italy

Day 3
Portofino
Italy
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Portofino, Italy Colorful Houses
Beautiful sunny day with colorful houses on the coast of Portofino, Italy
Things to do in
Portofino
Tendered from 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM
The Italian Riviera's fishing village of Portofino has more to offer than the rows of brightly colored houses that made it famous — this coastal town is also a destination for nature lovers eager to explore. Cruise to Portofino and hike through the Regional Park: Its lushly forested coastal paths look down dramatic cliffsides to the Mediterranean below. Or head to Portofino Marine Reserve, where you can kayak on the crystal-clear waters, taking in views of the quaint village as you paddle by under the weathered cliffs. Then, people-watch in one of Portofino's quaint piazzas, or head to nearby Cervara Abbey, an ancient monastery turned into a terraced garden.
Portofino, Italy Regional Park
Promontory in Portofino regional park overlooking the Mediterranean Sea, in Portofino, Italy

Take a Hike

Grab your hiking boots and get ready for an adventure through Portofino Regional Park. The park is home to an extensive network of lush trails and coastal paths that overlook the Mediterranean Sea. You can hike through this unique environment during both the winter and summer, making it the perfect year-round activity for outdoor enthusiasts.
Portofino, Italy Church of St George
iew of Church of St. George (1154), Portofino, Italy

Village Views

Stretch your legs and climb to the top of the hill above Portofino. Here, you'll come to the Church of St. George, where you can take in sweeping views of the vibrant village below. Continue walking an additional 10 minutes, and you'll find yourself at Castello Brown, which overlooks the stunning bay, making it the premier spot to watch the boats come in and out of the harbor.
Portofino, Italy Marine Reserve
Small bay in the natural marine reserve, cala dell'oro, in Portofino, Italy

Dive Right In

The Portofino Marine Reserve stretches across the city and is home to a variety of marine life and is a must-see for divers. Cruise to Portofino and explore shipwrecks, natural walls and drop-offs, and come face to face with the flounder and octopus that call this part of the Mediterranean home.
Portofino, Italy Pesto Alla Genovese
Pesto alla genovese, Ligurian style pesto spaghetti with basil, in an eatery in Portofino, Italy

Local Cuisine

Come hungry to Portofino — home to Ligurian cuisine, the originator of some of Italy's most popular culinary exports. Sample pasta dressed in pesto alla genovese, with basil, pine nuts, cheese and garlic. Try fresh focaccia, eaten here like a pizza straight out of the oven. During your Portofino cruise, sink your teeth into a piece of branzino (European sea bass) baked under a mound of sea salt.
Portofino, Italy Fabrics
Scarves and fabrics for sale in a shop in Portofino, Italy

Shopping

Portofino is a dream destination for shopaholics. Luxury boutiques and upscale shops line the streets and piazzas. If buying Gucci or Salvatore Ferragamo in Italy isn't your thing, there are several lesser-known and less expensive shops in Piazza Martiri dell'Olivetta selling beautiful cashmere, which is commonly found in Portofino.

Day 4: Provence, France

Day 4
Provence
Marseille, France
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Provence (Marseille), France, Notre Dame de la Garde Basilica
The Notre Dame de la Garde basilica towering over the city of Marseille, France
Things to do in
Provence
From 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
France's oldest city, Marseille blends ancient charm with Provencal beauty. In the morning, head to the fish market Quai des Belges, where trade has been going on for more than 2,600 years — stroll along the promenades and 18th-century warehouses, and grab a cafe au lait and a melon tarte from one of the cafes on the ground floor. Cruise to Provence and check out the Basilique Notre-Dame de la Garde: Built in the 19th century in a neo-Byzantine style, its golden statue of the Virgin and Child dominates the Marseille skyline. Then, take in the modern architecture and Mediterranean cultural artifacts at the MuCEM art museum, or see the craggy limestone cliffs of Calanques National Park, a half-hour drive outside the city.
Provence (Marseille), France, Notre Dame de la Garde Basilica Close Up
The steps leading up to the Notre Dame de la Garde basilica in Marseille, France

Climb to the Heavens

Climb the steps to 19th-century Basilique Notre-Dame de la Garde, rising 150 meters above the water. At its peak is a large golden statue of the Virgin Mary and Child, said to watch over Marseille's maritime community. The basilica incorporates a renaissance-era fort that includes a serene chapel with ornate stained-glass windows.
Insider tip
To the north-west you'll find L'Estaque, one of the fishing villages that inspired many of France's greatest artists in the late 19th century, including Cezanne and Monticelli.
Provence (Marseille), France, Calanques D'En Vau bay
The Calanques D'En Vay bay in France

Natural Drama

At Calanques National Park, you'll find rough, white limestone cliffs that rise sharply above the sea. You can take a relaxing boat tour or even kayak in the area. The park stretches from Marseille to La Ciotat, where you'll encounter landscapes of lime rock and red conglomerate. The park is internationally known for its sublime landscapes, biodiversity and rich heritage.
Insider tip
Musee des Docks Romains, which covers the site of one of the world's few known Roman warehouses, is where you'll find dolia, huge ceramic jugs that can store up to two thousand liters of olive oil or wine.
Provence (Marseille), France, Palais de Longchamp
The fountain in front of the Palais de Longchamp

Cultural Stroll

Make your way on foot down Boulevard Longchamp, with its posh 19th-century houses, tree-lined promenade and stunning Palais Longchamp, where you'll wander into a well-manicured park with a stately colonnade and fountain. It's also home to two of the city's finest museums, the Natural Museum and the Museum of Fine Art, both of which are well worth a stop.
Insider tip
If you've read "The Count of Monte Cristo," the name Chateau d'If might ring a bell. Visit this 16th-century castle to learn about the realities of prison life at the time of Dumas's novel. You can even take a boat here directly from the port.
Provence (Marseille), France, Blue mussels in bouillabaisse
Blue mussels in bouillabaisse

Local Cuisine

The signature dish of Marseille is without a doubt the savory bouillabaisse. This savory fish stew is packed with an array of local seafood, including clams, white fish, mussels or lobster, and the broth is flavored with fennel and pastis, a local licorice-flavored liqueur — dive in with a crusty baguette for the full experience.
Provence (Marseille), France, Soap bars at market
Famous soap from Marseille, France for sale at a market

Shopping

Le Panier, just north of the port, dates back to 600 BC. While its colored walls, narrow streets and sunny squares once made up one of the poorest districts of the city, today it's filled with trendy independent boutiques, craft shops and galleries. Cruise to Provence and look for handmade savon de Marseille, the traditional green or white soap made with olive oil that has been exported from Marseille for centuries.

Day 5: Sete, France

Day 5
Sete
France
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Sete, France, Theater de la Mer
Theater de la Mer on the coast of Sete, France
Things to do in
Sete
From 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Think France's Mediterranean coast is all about fancy yachts and glamorous movie stars? The port town of Sete will make you think again. Understated and unpretentious, Sete sits along the coast of France's laid-back Occitanie region. No matter how long your stop in Sete lasts, a stroll through this humble harbor will feel like hitting the most satisfying reset button with your Sete cruise. Once you've taken in Sete's charming port and canal-filled Old Town, hike to the view point at Mont St.-Clair, or sit down at the shore for a lunch of oysters harvested from nearby Thau Lagoon.
Sete, France, Royal Canal
The Royal Canal in Sete, France

Quays and Canals

The most striking feature of central Sete is the system of canals that crisscross its old town. You'll find shops, kiosks and museums on the quays jutting out into the water. Start at the broad Canal Royal, built in the 17th century during the reign of King Louis XIV.
Insider tip
Sete's lack of mass tourism is charming, but it also means people here are less likely to speak English and not as accustomed to assisting tourists as those in, say, Cannes or Marseilles.
Sete, France, Pristine beach
A pristine beach in Sete, France

Be a Beach Bum

Easily accesible from town center, Sete's beaches offer fine white sand and sprawling vistas. Lazaret beach is the closest to town center. Other popular spots include the long Plage des Quilles and the smaller Plage de la Corniche, located along a scenic oceanfront boulevard.
Insider tip
If you happen to be visiting Sete in late August, check out Fete de Saint Louis, a festival dedicated to the local pastime of water jousting.
Sete, France, Coastal graveyard
A coastal graveyard overlooking the ocean in Sete, France

Drop-Dead Gorgeous

Why not do something a little strange while in Sete? Less than 30 minutes by foot from the port, the Cimetiere Marin offers a captivating duality: gorgeous ocean views in contrast with rows of graves dating back to the 1600s.
Sete, France, Half Dozen Oysters
A white plate with a half dozen oysters on ice

Local Cuisine

Seafood is the specialty in Sete, especially oysters and mussels, which live in the Thau Lagoon just offshore. Feeling adventurous? Try bourride de lotte a la Setois, a monkfish stew, or la tielle Setoise, a flaky-crust octopus pie. The best-loved restaurants are located conveniently near the port.
Sete, France, Lavender Soaps
An assortment of lavender soaps in France

Shopping

If you're looking for a quirky souvenir, visit the unique Bad George's shop in the heart of the Old Town, where you can find distinctive Sete-themed t-shirts, tote bags and more. Cruise to Sete, France to shop for traditional south-of-France souvenirs, including soaps scented with local lavender, at Le Pavois Setois near Corniche Beach.

Day 6: Cruising

Day 6
Cruising
At Sea
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Family Celebrating a Hole in One
Family Playing Mini Golf on Liberty of the Seas
CAN'T MISS FAVORITES
Young Woman Climbing
Young Woman Climbing Up the Rock Wall

Rock Climbing Wall

Rise to the occasion and take on the signature Rock Climbing Wall. From beginners to speed climbers, everyone can enjoy an unparalleled view from 40 feet above deck. Included in your fare, no reservation required.
Sister Teaching Younger Brother Mini Golf
Family Enjoying a Round of Mini Golf

Mini Golf

Hit the links on the high seas! Refine your mini-golf game on a green that overlooks a sea of blue. Included in your fare, no reservation required.

Day 7: Cartagena, Spain

Day 7
Cartagena
Spain
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Cartagena, Spain, City Hall
City hall in Cartagena, Spain
Things to do in
Cartagena
From 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Cartagena greets you with its ancient Mediterranean port on Spain's southeastern coast. Originally governed by the Carthaginians and subsequently by the Romans, Arabs and Castilians, this pedestrian-friendly city is a history buff's dream port. Visit the 2,000-year-old Roman Theatre and the attached museum, where you'll find an ancient altar to Jupiter and a statue of Apollo. Then, check out the late 19th-century modernist architecture of Cartagena's historic center. Cruises to Cartagena, Spain allow you to stroll down blue-marble-tiled pedestrian-only Calle Mayor. Or take the 30-minute drive to the Batteria de Castillitos, a medieval-style fortress situated among the picturesque mountain landscape.
Cartagena, Spain Roman Theater
Couple Walking Through Spain's Roman Theater

Roman Holiday

Check out Cartagena's ancient Roman Theater — built in the first century A.D. and only uncovered in 1987, it's since been reconstructed. Duck into its museum, which passes beneath a palace and a church before it reaches the theater.
Insider tip
Spanish shops close for siesta between 2 and 5 p.m., and restaurants from about 4 p.m. until around 8 p.m.
Cartagena, Spain, Castle of Cartagena
The Castle of Cartagena in Cartagena, Spain

Castle on the Hill

The 18th-century castle called Concepcion Castle sits on a hill facing Cartagena. Walk uphill to visit the castle and its history center, or catch the lift at Calle Gisbert for amazing panoramic views en route.
Insider tip
Try Asiatico, a common Cartagena coffee drink with condensed milk, brandy, the Spanish liqueur Licor 43, cinnamon and lemon zest.
Cartagena, Spain Historic Buildings
Cartagena, Spain Historic Buildings Intricate Details

The New Within the Old

For all its ancient allure, Cartagena also has Modernist architecture, which you can see along the Calle Mayor area. One example is the home of Cervantes, designed by a local Cartagena architect. Check out the Casino, the Gran Hotel and the railway station for more examples of this exuberantly gaudy style with your Spain Cruise.
Insider tip
Don't confuse Cartagena, Spain, and Cartagena, Colombia, while planning your trip!
Spain Cartagena Paella Local Cuisine
Chef Making Traditional Spanish Paella

Local Cuisine

In Cartagena, you'll find authentic Mediterranean dishes featuring fresh-caught seafood, like lightly tempura-battered fried squid. Red prawns from the Mar Menor lagoon and fig bread are local delicacies. Explore off the main tourist streets and hit a tapas bar for tasty fare such as Serrano ham, toasted Cartagena almonds and cracked local olives.
Spain Cartagena Local Artisan Ceramics
Spain Cartagena Local Artisan Ceramics Shopping

Shopping

The clean, pedestrians-only shopping street Calle Mayor is an easy walk from the port and has the high-street stores of England and Spain. An El Corte Ingles department store and restaurants are housed in gorgeous buildings. Look for ceramics and leather goods in interesting boutiques and shops when you cruise to Cartagena, Spain.

Day 8: Gibraltar, United Kingdom

Day 8
Gibraltar
United Kingdom
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Gibraltar, United Kingdom, Aerial View Of Rock
Aerial View of the Rock of Gibraltar
Things to do in
Gibraltar
From 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Gibraltar rocks — in more ways than one. From ancient castles to lush botanical gardens and the panoramic views you enjoy from the city's cable car, this British Overseas Territory is more than its most famous landmark, the Rock of Gibraltar. Cruise to Gibraltar and discover more than 300 years of history while touring landmarks like the Convent, where Gibraltar's governors have resided since the 18th century. Or monkey around with Barbary macaques, a semi-wild species of monkey that calls the territory home. Finish your day with a stroll through the port area, and dine outdoors for ocean views and seafood-focused, Mediterranean-inspired eats.
Gibraltar, United Kingdom, Europa Point
View of the Rock of Gibraltar from Europa Point

Trace History

Gibraltar's Moorish Castle is both its most popular historical attraction and its oldest one, dating back to the 8th century. Explore more recent history at British colonial buildings like the Convent and the Gibraltar Parliament. Or explore the city's multicultural roots at the Cathedral of St. Mary the Crowned, Gibraltar Hindu Temple or Ibrahim-al-Ibrahim Mosque, a gift from the Saudi king.
Insider tip
Despite its small size, Gibraltar boasts days worth of activities. Focusing in on the most important ones to you will help you get the most out of your adventure.
Gibraltar, United Kingdom, Monkey
A monkey sitting on a ledge with the Rock of Gibraltar in the background

Monkey Around

Hundreds of playful Barbary macaques reside at the so-called Top of the Rock. You can reach it by cable car or by walking up the Mediterranean steps. Hungry for more ecotourism? Check out the Gibraltar Botanic Gardens, take a boat trip out on the bay to see the dolphins, or head to scenic Europa Point, which provides views of Africa on clear days.
Insider tip
Don't worry about exchanging your euros for Gibraltarian pounds — most shops in Gibraltar will happily accept the former, even if they give you change in the latter.
Gibraltar, United Kingdom, Lighthouse
A red and white lighthouse in Gibraltar, United Kingdom

Get Some Light Exercise

At just 2.7 square miles in area, Gibraltar is small enough you can explore a lot of it while you're here with your cruise. That said, you need not wander far from Gibraltar Port in order to enjoy yourself. Grab a lunch of moules marinieres at a portside restaurant, then walk it off with a stroll out to the island's southern tip, Europa Point, and iconic Trinity Lighthouse.
Gibraltar, United Kingdom, Profiteroles Cream Pastry
Four profiteroles cream pastries on a white plate

Local Cuisine

Not surprisingly, the star of Gibraltar's culinary scene is fresh seafood, with Atlantic white fish and shellfish taking center stage. You'll also find a variety of cultural influences: Try Italian-inspired chickpea-flour calentita bread and the national dish profiterole, a French puff-pastry filled with sweet whipped cream. Al fresco dining is the way to go here, whether you sit portside or on pedestrian-filled Casemates Square.
Gibraltar, United Kingdom, Handmade Glass
Assorted handmade glass ornaments

Shopping

Gibraltar's most popular keepsake is handmade glass. Glass shops from Main Street to Casemates Square will be happy to wrap your gifts up for safekeeping. If you're still nervous about transporting glass, you can admire the glass-makers at their craft, or purchase other souvenirs like artisan chocolate or Barbary macaque stuffed animals during your Iberian Peninsula cruises.

Day 9: Málaga, Spain

Day 9
Málaga
Spain
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Málaga, Spain, Marina
A marina in Malaga, Spain
Things to do in
Málaga
From 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
The hub of Spain's southern Costa del Sol, Málaga is the picture of paradise. Scale the hilltop to dramatic La Alcazaba, the sandy-colored Moorish fortress dating back to the 11th century that overlooks this ancient seaside city. Sun yourself on the idyllic beaches of Caleta and Malagueta, taking in views of the mountains across the bay. See the eccentric works of modernist master Pablo Picasso, the city's most famous native son, at the Picasso Museum. Cruise to Málaga and immerse yourself in baroque and renaissance architecture at Málaga Cathedral, with its elaborate arches and stone reliefs depicting the saints, or turn the clock back to the first century A.D. at the ruins of the Roman Theatre.
Málaga, Spain, Alcazaba fortress
View of the Alcazaba fortress in Malaga, Spain

Moor History

Ascend to the top of La Alcazaba, the medieval Moorish fortress that towers over the city. This palatial fortification was built by the Hammudid dynasty in the early 11th century and is the best-preserved Moorish castle in Spain. From here, you can wander down to the Roman Amphitheatre that sits beneath it, before you gaze up at the 16th-century cathedral that sits right in the city center.
Insider tip
The center of Málaga is relatively small and walkable, but don't take this for granted — three to five hours will pass quickly.
Málaga, Spain, Malagueta beach sign
The Malagueta beach sign in Malaga, Spain

Work on Your Tan

It just wouldn't be a trip to the Costa del Sol without a little coast and sun. Most tourists stick to the convenient La Malagueta Beach, but if you've got more than a couple hours in Málaga, you can take a taxi to less crowded but equally beautiful beaches to the east, like Playamar or Playa de Burriana.
Insider tip
If you don't speak Spanish, make sure to cache a Spanish dictionary in your smartphone's Translate app.
Málaga, Spain, Plaza de la Merced
Plaza de la Merced in Malaga, Spain

Paint With Picasso

The most obvious way to follow Málaga's Picasso trail is to visit the Picasso Museum, which has many pieces you won't find anywhere else. You can also visit the artist's birthplace, or take a "Ride With Picasso" bike tour that features Picasso-focused city sightseeing, including Plaza de Merced, where the formidable painter took his first steps as a child.
Málaga, Spain Gambas Pil Pil dish
Gambas Pil Pil shrimp dish in a bowl

Local Cuisine

Seafood is the focus of gastronomy in Málaga. Don't miss the city's signature dish of gambas al pil-pil, flash-fried fresh prawns with garlic, paprika and chilies. During your Málaga cruise, order a basket of pescado frito, an array of local white fish, clams and other seafood breaded and fried. Finish up with tarta malaguena, a cake made with almonds and raisins, and a glass of Málaga dessert wine.
Málaga, Spain, Ceramic Pottery
Ceramic pottery for sale in Spain

Shopping

Pop into a local wine shop to take a bottle of Málaga dessert wine back home with you. Málaga cruises provide access to an eclectic range of other souvenirs, like hand-painted Andalusian ceramics or handmade fans to help you beat the heat. You can also find some of Spain's best olive oil here — pick up some of this cloudy, spicy liquid gold from the Ataranzas Market.

Day 10: Cruising

Day 10
Cruising
At Sea
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Grilled Veal Chop - Chops Grille
Grilled Veal Chop entree at the specialty, Chops Grille restaurant. Cruise vacation fine dining steaks served table side.
FOR FOODIES
Izumi Sushi Chef Prepping Food
Izumi Sushi Chef Prepping Food

Izumi

Say “Konnichiwa” to a reimagined favorite. Sushi, sashimi and more, all made-to-order with intense flavors, the best ingredients and impeccable presentation.
Salad - Chops Grille
Salad served at the fine dining steakhouse, Chops Grille. Best cruise vacation restaurant dining served table side.

Chops Grille

For more than a decade, the chefs of Chops Grille have proudly presented quality, hand-cut prime steaks at this hallmark Royal Caribbean restaurant.

Day 11: Palma De Mallorca, Spain

Day 11
Palma De Mallorca
Spain
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Palma De Mallorca, Spain, Cityscape
The Palma de Mallorca, Spain cityscape with La Seu cathedral towering over the city
Things to do in
Palma De Mallorca
From 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
The Spanish island of Mallorca offers towering mountains and dramatic cliffs rising over clear, blue water — but its hidden gem is Palma de Mallorca, the island's capital and largest city, where you'll find quaint historic streets, Gothic castles and gastronomic delights. Cruise to Palma de Mallorca and check out one-of-a-kind Palma Cathedral: The 14th-century Gothic spires of exterior contrast the modernist interior designed by in the early 1900s by Gaudi. See the circular courtyard and Arab-inspired arches of Castell de Bellver, and take in the fresh scent of the miles of pine forest that surround it. Or rent bikes and pedal east to Palma Beach, where you can soak in the sun on the white sands and clear waves.
Palma De Mallorca, Spain, La Seu Cathedral and Almudaina castle
La Seu cathedral and Almudaina castle

Castles and Cathedrals

Palma de Mallorca's historic places look like something out of "Game of Thrones." Whether you traipse through the courtyard of 14th-century Bellver Castle or say your prayers inside Gothic Palma Cathedral, Palma de Mallorca can transport you back to medieval times. Your can also see the city's unique Arab influence dating back to the 10th-century Moorish conquest at spots like the Arab Baths.
Insider tip
If you're more interested in ocean time than historic sites, book a boat tour to see the coastline of Mallorca from the sunlit waves.
Palma De Mallorca, Spain, Cala Llombards beach
People enjoying Cala Llombards beach in Palma de Mallorca, Spain

Get Your Beach On

It's no surprise that Palma de Mallorca is home to some of the world's best beaches — what's astonishing is just how clear blue the water is at Cala Llombards, or how the warm, golden sands of Playa El Arenal will make you wish you never had to leave. No wonder so many red and yellow umbrellas dot the sands here.
Insider tip
Hours of operation for the Palma cathedral vary by season so be sure to check before you arrive.
Palma De Mallorca, Spain, Cuevas del Drach
The Cuevas del Drach in Palma de Mallorca, Spain

Explore a Dragon's Lair

Head to Porto Cristo on the east side of the island, where you'll find the Cuevas del Drach — the dragon caves. While no actual dragons have been spotted here, the stalactites and stalagmites of this ancient underground cave make it easy to imagine. You can even take a violin-serenaded boat ride on the cave's underground lake during your cruise.
Palma De Mallorca, Spain, Tombet dish
A bowl of tombet, a traditional vegetable dish

Local Cuisine

Mallorca is technically part of Spain, but Palma de Mallorca's cuisine is a world unto itself. Savor tombet, a vegetarian stew with sweet potatoes and carrots that's Mallorca's take on ratatouille. Cruise to Palma de Mallorca to sample the eclectic coca mallorquina, a kind of crunchy flatbread pizza with an olive oil-rich crust topped with roasted red peppers.
Palma De Mallorca, Spain, Straw bag market
A straw bag market in Palma de Mallorca, Spain

Shopping

Palma's premier shopping is to be had in the Passeig de Born neighborhood. Shop here for upscale brands like Mulberry and Zara. Then, head to Jaume III and Sant Miquel streets for boutiques specializing in fine local goods: Choose a necklace or earrings made with world-famous Mallorcan pearls, try on a pair of handmaid Menorquina sandals, or marvel at handicrafts like colorful pottery and traditional straw bags.

Day 12: Barcelona, Spain

Day 12
Barcelona
Spain
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Barcelona, Spain Park Guell
View of the city from Park Guell in Barcelona, Spain
Things to do in
Barcelona
Arrives at 6:00 AM
It’s easy to see why Barcelona is the most-visited city in Spain. As the capital of the country’s Catalonia region, this cityscape’s cultural mosaic pieces together a 2,000-year-old hodgepodge of sun-drenched beaches, cutting edge architecture, and a world-renowned dining and drinking scene. Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí left his modernist handprint all over the city, while medieval treasures linger in historic Gothic Quarter squares. Get lost in the whimsical gardens of Park Güell or savor a chef-led Catalan cooking class. Browse art collections dedicated to Picasso and Miro— or ride a cable car to the top of Montjuïc Hill, relishing citywide views along the way.
Spain Barcelona La Sagrada Familia Interior
La Sagrada Familia Interior Colorful

SKY HIGH DELIGHTS

Get an up-close glimpse of La Sagrada Família, a cathedral masterwork designed by celebrated Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí. Marvel at its sky-piercing spires and then step inside to admire intricate mosaics, Montjuïc stone pillars and the Nativity façade. You can even climb to the tippy-top of the spires for panoramic city views.
Spain Barcelona Barceloneta Beach
Barceloneta Beach at Sunset

SEAS THE DAY

With seven beaches spanning more than two miles of Mediterranean coastline, Barcelona’s harborfront is known for some of the world’s best sun-seeking and on-the-sea adventures. Lounge along the shore, kayak deep blue waters— or charter a fishing trip for the chance to reel in tuna, swordfish or Mediterranean spearfish.
Barcelona Spain La Rambla Historic Buildings
La Rambla Historic Buildings

IN THE MIX

Take a stroll along La Rambla’s pedestrian boulevard to experience the city’s pure essence. Souvenir shops, street artists, flower stalls, sidewalk cafes and Catalan folk sardana dancers set a lively scene. Its marvelous centerpiece, La Catedral, dates from the 1200s— and its tower delivers sweeping views of medieval Barcelona.
Spain Barcelona Sparkling Cava Wine
Couple Enjoying the Local Sparkling Cava Wine

LOCAL CUISINE

Barcelona has mastered the art of eating. Many restaurants serve up creative nueva cocina española, while waterfront spots dish out seafood paella and multi-course lunch menus include a glass of sparkling cava wine. For a taste of Catalan cooking, try pa amb tomàquet (tomato-topped bread). Or nibble on Spanish tapas (bite-sized appetizers) around the bar like a local, with house-made vermouth in hand.
Spain Barcelona Local Fresh Market Shopping
Couple Strolling Through the Fresh Local Market

SHOPPING

You could spend hours checking out the markets of Barcelona for high-quality leatherwear, jewelry, old books and unique housewares. Passeig de Gràcia and Barcelona Shopping Line are two popular retail promenades— and the Gothic Quarter is home to dozens of family-owned shops that sell textiles, stationery, decorative ceramic tiles and earthenware kitchenware.

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